Who has the Power?

First example in a meeting:  “I hear what you are saying, but we’re not going to do that.”

Second example is a father to his child trying to pursuade him to choose an alternative:  “What if we put ice cream on top of the cheeseburger?”

The first ends on a negative and can have the effect of shutting down the discussion for further ideas, arguably giving the speaker power over the discussion, but not the problem being solved. The second ends on a positive without dismissing the child’s idea entirely, leaving the child with the understanding that discussion is important as it inspires ideas and, clearly, creative and collaborative problem solving, thus empowering the child to continue to seek knowledge, the truest form of power. Give a man a fish, he’ll eat for a day. Teach a man to fish and you’ll feed him for a lifetime.

Check out the original post by Nicholas Thompson (The New Yorker) and the comment string:

Original Post: https://www.linkedin.com/hp/update/6100806761839677440 

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